The Process of Inspiration

There are different types of writing in high school and college alike, differing in levels of difficulty. However, I personally studied under Veritas Press in high school and was required to write two 1,000 word essays, three paragraph responses, and sixty one sentence answers in five hours. Finding inspiration for a feat such as that was challenging the first time I took that final. As I wrote more philosophical, historical, and social issue papers more often, I began to pick up my own method of inspiring myself to write better essays by changing my outlook on the question at hand. Ultimately, my inspiration boiled down to this: if I were asked this question by someone at anytime in my life, would I have a proper answer?

The first step to finding the inspiration to write is just writing it. Blabber on about that question or essay proposition and do not stop writing. Sometimes when I do this, I look back at some of the things I wrote and ask myself, What on earth was I thinking? There are also other times I look back and think I was really getting somewhere, and that section of the rough draft almost always makes it to the final paper. Those rants help me to weed through different ideas to linger on in my essay and correlate issues at hand to modern day problems and solutions, which in turn earned me high marks. 

The next step to inspiration is getting excited about the topic. Sometimes it is hard getting motivated to write another paper on global warming when other students have already addressed the issue in their papers, so it feels useless writing about it now. What I discovered about these beaten to death, overwritten topics is that writing essays about these help me in my own way of critical thinking. Most people do not stop to ponder why this or that happens, and if they do then they just talk about it rather than do anything about it. This is where I like to take a moment and brainstorm. Even though I do not have the scientific knowledge of solving global warming, what I can do is spitball ideas and concepts of my own on solving the problem. Even if some ideas are better than others, brainstorming my own methods on solving issues almost always gives me something to write on and the motivation to write it.

Passion on a subject and hope for the future are fueling goals for inspiration on any subject, whether it be a light subject or heavily debated topic. Along with this search for knowledge and answers to questions, it helps me have better reasoning and logic for the next topic thrown my way. Then, before I knew it, I had people walking up to me and asking me questions I never imagined I would tackle, such as how do I deal with depression, what is the meaning of life, how do I live life to the fullest, and more. Because I answered these types of topic questions in high school and took time to develop responses, I began to think critically more often. Not only that, but it helped prepare me for college level education and writing even more challenging, longer papers than I had before.